34th Judicial District

Hon. Manuel A. Fernandez

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Drug Court

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ST. BERNARD PARISH ADULT DRUG COURT INC.
THIRTY FOURTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT
PARISH OF ST. BERNARD
STATE OF LOUISIANA

HONORABLE JUDGE KIRK VAUGHN, PRESIDING
DONALD G. MULLER, PROGRAM ADMINISTRATOR
LSU HEALTH SCIENCES, TREATMENT PROVIDER

ADDRESS:

1009 WEST MOREAU STREET
(AT THE OLD DRIVER’S LICENSE OFFICE NEXT TO COURTHOUSE)
CHALMETTE, LA 70043
PHONE: 504-278-4455
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

ADULT DRUG COURT SCHEDULE

COURT CONVENES AT 9:00 A. M.

 

January 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

Level

 

February 2013

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Level

Level

Level


March 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

April 2013

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Level

Level

Level

Level

 

May 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

June 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

July 2013

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Level

Level

Level

Level

 

August 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

September 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

October 2013

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Level

Level

Level

Level

 

November 2013

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Level

Level

Level

Level

 

December 2013

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Level

Level

Level

 

January 2012
3rd Level I, II, III, IV
9th Level I
17th Level I, II
23rd Level I, III
30th Level I, II, IV

 

February 2012
6th Level I
13th Level I, II, III
22nd Level I
27th Level I, II, IV

March 2012
5th Level I
12th Level I, II, III
19th Level I
26th Level I, II, IV

 

April 2012
2th Level I, III
9th Level I, II
16th Level I
23th Level I, II, III, IV
30th Level I

 

May 2012
7th Level I, II
14th Level I, III
21st Level I, II, IV
29th Level I

 

June 2012
4th Level I, II, III
11th Level I
18th Level I, II, IV
25th Level I, III

 

July 2012
2nd Level I, II
9th Level I
16th Level I, II, III, IV
23rd Level I
30th Level I, II

 

August 2012
6th Level I, III
13th Level I, II, IV
20th Level I
27th Level I, II, III

 

September 2012
4th Level I
10th Level I, II, IV
17th Level I, III
24th Level I, II

 

October 2012
1st Level I
8th Level I, II, III, IV
15th Level I
22nd Level I, II
29th Level I, II, III

 

November 2012
5th Level I, IV
13th Level I, II
19th Level I, II
19th Level I, III
26th Level I, II

 

December 2012
3rd Level I, IV
10th Level I, II, III
17th Level I
26th Level I, II

 

 




ST.BERNARD PARISH JUVENILE DRUG COURT INC.

COURT CONVENES AT 3:00 P.M.



January 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level
30th Level I

 

February 2013

Level

Level

Level
Level

 

March 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level


April 2013

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Level

Level

Level

Level

 

May 2013

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Level

Level

Level



June 2013

Level
11th Level

Level

Level



July 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

Level


August 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

 

September 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

 

October 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

Level

 

November 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level

 

December 2013

Level

Level

Level

Level



January 2012
3rd Level I, II, III
9th Level I, II
17th Level I
23rd Level I, II, III
30th Level I

 

February 2012
6th Level I, II
13th Level I, III
22nd Level I, II
27th Level I

 

March 2012
5th Level I, II, III
12th Level I
19th Level I, II
26th Level I, III


April 2012
2th Level I, II
9th Level I
16th Level I, II, III
23th Level I
30th Level I, II

 

May 2012
7th Level I, III
14th Level I, II
21st Level I, III
29th Level I, II



June 2012
4th Level I
11th Level I, II, III
18th Level I
25th Level I, II



July 2012
2nd Level I, III
9th Level I, II
16th Level I
23rd Level I, II, III
30th Level I


August 2012
6th Level I, II
13th Level I
20th Level I, II, III
27th Level I

 

September 2012
4th Level l,ll
10th Level l,lll
17th Level l,ll
24th Level l

 

October 2012
1st Level l,lll
8th Level l,ll
15th Level l
22nd Level l,ll,lll
29th Level l

 

November 2012
5th Level l,lll
13th Level l,ll
19th Level l
26th Level l,ll,lll

 

December 2012
3rd Level l
10th Level l,ll
17th Level l,lll
26th Level l,ll

 

JUVENILE DRUG COURT

HONORABLE JUDGE JACQUES SANBORN, PRESIDING

The tragedy of staggering crime statistics and the frightening aftermath of increasing court caseloads, prison overcrowding and high instances of repeat offenders is now a national phenomenon. Victims are not alone in experiencing the effects of crime; it is a far-reaching problem, leaving its devastating stamp on area businesses, families, neighborhoods and schools.

 

Throughout the country, community leaders, law enforcement officials and concerned citizens agree that something must be done to overcome the current crime problems. The drug court system is an innovative and viable alternative aimed at combating and abating this growing dilemma.

This program was made possible through the cooperation of all of the judges of the 34th Judicial District Court, St. Bernard Parish District Attorney’s Office, Indigent Defender Board, St. Bernard Probation and Community Service, Clerk’s Office, Nunez Community College, and the Louisiana Office of Alcohol and Drug Abuse.

According to the National Institute of Justice, as high as 85% of all arrests are drug related.

Given these shocking statistics, it is little wonder that drug courts are rapidly being implemented by jurisdictions across the United States. Major cities, including Miami, Denver and Washington, D.C. have embraced the drug court as an effective alternative to traditional punitive justice.

For St. Bernard Parish, the drug court stands as an answer to a growing problem that can no longer be ignored. It represents a working means to attain long-term parish goals to increase the sobriety of alcohol and drug related offenders thereby decreasing the number of repeat crimes and returning offenders to society as productive, law-abiding citizens.

The St. Bernard Parish Intensive Drug Court, established in July 2003, is a program designed for non-violent, first-time, felony offenders who are charged with possession of a controlled dangerous substance or the distribution of a small quantity of drugs or is charged with a non drug felony related to drug use and other screening procedure selected by the treatment administrator, whose results indicate a substance abuse addiction and merit the need for treatment.

The 18-month program provides progressive (i.e., community service hours, increase fees, a day observing in court, home incarceration, days in jail), substance abuse treatment, cognitive therapy, and judicial supervision/monitoring. A monthly fee and an application fee are required of all clients. In addition, the program provides the client assistance in obtaining education, job skills, and other training enabling them to be productive members of society through referral to community resources.

Additionally, treatment staff and case management staff provide weekly progress reports to the Drug Court Judges on each client. Through the progress report, treatment and case management staff can recommend a need for sanction or incentive. At any point in the program, the judge can remove a client from the Drug Court Program, advance or demote a client to another level, reduce the court fees of a client, reduce/increase the NA/AA participation, or reduce/increase the urine screen requirement, etc.

The Drug Court Program is intensive and requires a real demonstrated commitment by the offender. The program requires the client to attend court weekly for at least the first three months of their involvement. Additionally, the client is expected to participate in Narcotics Anonymous or Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, multiple drug screens, and multiple group sessions each week.

The time commitment is worthwhile though because the program assists clients in reclaiming their lives. At the end of the program, a client graduates and the charges are removed from their record (in accord with La. R.S. 13:5304). As a result of the Drug Court Program, the client is given an opportunity at a new life.



HOW IT WORKS

Once a defendant is admitted to the drug court program, the judge after hearing recommendations from the attorneys, will prescribe a stringent, long-term program to which the defendant must adhere. The specifies of such a program may include mandatory, random urinalysis testing. Narcotics Anonymous/Alcoholics Anonymous meetings, frequent court appearances, meetings with case managers and a wide variety of treatment sessions.

Included among those treatment programs is Moral Reconation Training (MRT). MRT is a systematic cognitive restructuring program shown to effectively reduce offender recidivism rates in many correctional programs nationwide. The program aids participants in recognizing, assessing, and ultimately altering the thought processes that are responsible for their substance abuse.

A key element in many drug court programs is the imposition of sanctions upon the defendant for non-compliance to the court’s treatment regimen. Quite simply, continued positive compliance is rewarded with reduced supervision while negative actions (missed court appearances, neglected meetings, etc.) warrant immediate and graduated consequences.

Potential sanctions in the St. Bernard Parish program will include overnight jail, community service, electronic home monitoring, observation of drug court from the jury box, increased urinalysis or the return to a higher level of supervision.

At any time during the course of the program, the judge overseeing the case can exercise the right to dismiss a defendant that he or she feels does not meet the rigorous demands of the program.



STRUCTURE

One of the most distinctive aspects of the drug court are the unique roles of the officers involved. While the drug treatment programs are often prescribed or recommended in traditional court, they are generally conducted outside of the court itself. In drug court however, the acting players, along with a treatment professional, work as a team whose sole objective is the rehabilitation of the offender.



JUDGE

Our Adult Drug Court Judge is Honorable Kirk Vaughn, Judge for Division “D.” Whereas direct interaction with defendants is minimal in traditional courts, the drug court judge interacts directly and often with the offender for a long period of time. A large number of judges associated with drug courts maintain that this opportunity to offer encouragement and moral support to defendants has proven to be one of the most rewarding aspects of their work.



PROSECUTING AND DEFENDING ATTORNEYS

Traditionally at odds with one another in the court setting, both defending and prosecuting attorneys take on similar roles in drug court. The defense attorney will actively work not to get his or her client out of the court system as is typically the case, but rather to keep the client in the system until rehabilitation is complete. Likewise, the prosecuting attorney, whose traditional goal is to convict offenders, agrees to act as a supporting figure in keeping the defendant out of jail and in the program.

THE COST

Today, the average cost to incarcerate a drug offender is an overwhelming $20,000 per year. Unfortunately, this price is expected to increase along with the growing number of repeat offenders. Conversely, the average annual cost for each drug court offender is $900 - $2,000.

In addition to representing significant annual savings, the proven effectiveness of drug courts in reducing recidivism and curtailing the “revolving door” syndrome associated with traditional courts promises to be a long-term solution in both monetary and societal terms.

WHY WE NEED IT

The continuous cycling in and out of our criminal justice system makes drug offenders among America’s most expensive criminals. Drug courts, considered by many to be one of the most effective justice systems in operation today, have proven themselves successful in keeping offenders permanently off drugs and out of court.

Recent research indicates that the average completion rate for drug court participants is 71% compared to the 10-15% reported in traditional court treatment programs. Of those who complete the Drug Court Program, the recidivism rate is as low as 4%. In addition, evidence shows that drug court programs have resulted in reduced jail costs per defendant, fewer babies born addicted to drugs, reduction of police overtime and more available court appearance time.

WHAT IS IT

Drug court is a special court designed to handle the cases of less serious, non-violent crimes committed by drug-using offenders. The system is unique in that it concentrates heavily on the offenders themselves, utilizing intense treatment combined with frequent court appearances to ensure that the offender remains both drug-free and crime-free.

Drug court participants are also encouraged to seek complete rehabilitation through supplemental programs including education, training and job referral services, housing assistance, family counseling and relapse prevention.

Modeled after the most successful operating drug courts in the nation, the St. Bernard Parish Intensive Probation Drug Court is based on a tiered system of imposed intervention, services and corresponding sanctions.